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Mobile display ad spend overtakes PC and tablet for first time, IAB says

Mobile display ad spend overtakes PC and tablet for first time, IAB says

By on Oct 17, 2016 in Blog | 0 comments

The amount spent on mobile display ads overtook that of PC and tablet for the first time ever, according to new research by PwC and the Internet Advertising Bureau (IAB). Mobile display ads raked in £802m of spend, while PC and tablet were behind at £762m, the Digital Adspend report said – signifying rapid growth in time spent on smartphones. Overall, digital advertising spend increased 16.4% in the first half of this year to £4.78.bn, which the report says is the highest first half growth rate in two years. The huge rise in mobile means that the the Advertising Association and Warc forecast it will account for 17.5% of all UK ad spend this year Mobile, however, takes center place as star of the digital advertising show, as total mobile ad spend increased by over 56% in the first half of this year. The report adds that 36p in every £1 spent on digital advertising now goes to mobile. This goes hand-in-hand with recent YouGov consumer data, which shows 82% of smartphone owners check their phones within an hour of waking. Mobile, mobile, mobile… Perhaps driven by the rapid adoption of smartphone use, video ads have seen an increase in spend by 67% to £474m during the first half of 2016, and mobile video spend alone grew 129%. Video currently accounts for a third of all display advertising and over a third of mobile display. It’s not the only area of advertising that’s seen an increase, however, with ad spend on mobile sites growing 43% to £745m. Content and native advertising spend increased 29% and paid search grew 18.1% – bolstered by mobile. “The huge rise in mobile means that the the Advertising Association and Warc forecast it will account for 17.5% of all UK ad spend this year, astonishing for such a relatively new medium but a fair reflection of the importance of mobile in people’s lives,” IAB UK’s Chief Strategy Officer, Tim Elkington told Marketing Tech. “People now spend more time online on their mobile than they do on a computer. Consequently, marketers devote more ad spend to mobile as they increasingly cotton on to the fact that people essentially carry an ad platform with them wherever...

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The art of content creation and the science of measurement

The art of content creation and the science of measurement

By on Aug 30, 2016 in Blog | 0 comments

Successful brands not only create engaging content, but they also measure the performance of that content. Columnist Jim Yu outlines four steps to help you balance the art and science of content marketing. Half of all B2B and B2C companies say they will increase their spending related to content marketing in the coming year. This growth means there will be even more content, more competition and higher standards for those who want to succeed. From the consumer standpoint, the online content world has seen shifts in levels of interest and activity. For both desktop and mobile, it’s become increasingly clear that the key to succeeding in this competitive digital landscape is to have a precise understanding of what customers want to see and providing it for them. Your content needs to resonate with the audience and drive them toward a call to action or conversion. Balancing art and science Successful content is driven by a careful balance between art and science. On the art side of the scale, you need to apply psychology and creativity to develop a story that engages people. You’re focusing on how your content makes people feel and how well it motivates them. You need to think outside the box to have a better understanding of what people want to see. On the science side, you need to measure your progress and results so that you can clearly see how well your content is performing and the direction you want to take moving forward. You’re thinking about strategy, lead generation and how well your content production aligns with other groups, like your sales...

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Pokémon Go, augmented reality and the future of local marketing

Pokémon Go, augmented reality and the future of local marketing

By on Jul 28, 2016 in Blog | 0 comments

Yesterday, as I was walking back from lunch, a middle-aged businessman stopped in front of me and took a picture of a dumpster with his smartphone — or at least that’s how it must have appeared to those uninitiated into the world of Pokémon Go. But I knew better, for at that moment, I happened to be playing the game myself. The businessman finished capturing his Pokémon, looked up at me and smiled sheepishly before scurrying off in pursuit of his next digital quarry. That’s when it occurred to me: The world of local marketing has fundamentally changed. For those of you who have yet to play the game (and as such, still have some semblance of control over your life), let me give you a brief rundown of the magical app that has kids, teenagers and adults alike lurking in nearby parks after midnight just to catch a few extra Pokémon. The freemium game uses your phone’s GPS and camera to turn the real world into a digitally augmented world teeming with wild Pokémon. To get started, you’ll need a smartphone and a good pair of walking shoes, because you’re going to have to leg some miles. After downloading the app, players (called “trainers”), wander aimlessly through urban jungle and countryside alike in search of little digital monsters known as Pokémon. You use the map on your smartphone to navigate, and as soon as you feel your phone buzz, look alive, because a Pokémon or a location of interest is nearby. If you corner a Pokémon (or should I say, if you walk toward them), the screen on your smartphone, with the help of your phone’s camera, will seemingly project the digital creature onto the physical world. Move the camera on your phone side to side, and the creature will remain fixed to a given spot. Then, in a quasi-Fruit-Ninja move, you proceed to flick Poké Balls at the creature on your screen to capture it. Now, here’s where it gets interesting — at least from a local marketing standpoint. The game includes places called PokéStops (where users can stock up on accessories and tools needed in-game) and Gyms (places where users go to train their captured Pokémon...

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Native videos posted by publishers’ Facebook Pages average 268% more shares than article links

Native videos posted by publishers’ Facebook Pages average 268% more shares than article links

By on Jul 16, 2016 in Blog | 0 comments

Our analysis of Facebook data, sourced from NewsWhip, hints that the latest News Feed tweak may mean more native videos, fewer links from publishers’ Pages. Facebook execs already believe that people’s news feeds “will be probably all video” in five years. Maybe a lot sooner when it comes to the publisher portion of people’s feeds after Facebook’s latest algorithm change rolls out. Late last month, Facebook announced a tweak to the uber-arbiter news feed algorithm that will make Pages’ organic reach more dependent on people sharing their Page posts. “We encourage Pages to post things that their audience are likely to share with their friends,” Facebook engineering director Lars Backstrom wrote in a company blog post advising Page owners that their organic reach and referral traffic may drop as a result of the change. So what are those “things” for Pages to post that people on Facebook are most likely to share? If you’re a publisher, they appear to be videos people can watch without leaving Facebook way more often than they are links to a publisher’s site, based on Facebook data collected through social news analytics tool NewsWhip. I used NewsWhip’s analytics tool to pull data for the 15 most popular publishers on Facebook, according to NewsWhip’s April 2016 list (the most recently available list). I’ll get in the weeds on the exact data I pulled at the bottom of this post, but for the sake of not alienating those uninterested in an itemized list, I looked at the 300 most-shared videos, the 300 most-shared photos, the 300 most-shared text posts and the 300 most-shared links across those publishers’ Facebook Pages — including some Pages connected to those publishers; I’ll explain that later — as well as the 300 most-shared links to their sites posted to Facebook by normal people. Before we get into the stats, let’s parse what Backstrom said in the aforementioned blog post about how Facebook’s tweaked algorithm will look at Page posts. “[I]f a lot of your referral traffic is the result of people sharing your content and their friends liking and commenting on it, there will be less of an impact than if the majority of your traffic comes directly through Page posts,”...

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Ad Spending on Original Digital Video Programming Increased 114% since 2014, According to IAB Research

Ad Spending on Original Digital Video Programming Increased 114% since 2014, According to IAB Research

By on Jun 10, 2016 in Blog | 0 comments

Participation in 2015 NewFronts Inspired Marketers & Media Buyers to Spend More On Original Digital Video Than They Planned NEW YORK, NY (May 2, 2016) — Advertisers and media buyers have made an impressive 114 percent increase in investments in original digital video programming over the past two years, according to the third annual “Digital Content NewFronts: Video Ad Spend Study.” This survey of 360 marketing and media buying professionals was conducted by Advertiser Perceptions and released today by the Interactive Advertising Bureau (IAB). Reinforcing the critical role the Digital Content NewFronts has played in media buying decisions, eight out of 10 respondents said that their attendance at the 2015 NewFronts resulted in increased spending on original digital video content in the 12 months that followed, and/or motivated them to increase original digital video budgets overall. Buyers who primarily focus on TV were more likely to commit those extra dollars at the NewFronts (64% vs. 42%), while digital-focused buyers were more likely to spend them throughout the year (49% vs. 41%). Nearly three-quarters (71%) of those surveyed also said that they plan to attend the 2016 NewFronts, expecting to spend more than a third of their overall digital video budgets for the year at the annual marketplace. The study further revealed that more than two-thirds of marketers and agency executives (68%) believe that original digital video will become as important as original TV programming in the next 3 to 5 years. In order to close the gap between digital video and TV programming, both groups want to buy digital video that reaches target audiences in high-quality programming and delivers more concrete ROI metrics. While the majority of buyers surveyed plans to spend more overall on all digital video (63%) and mobile video (62%), original digital video content has grown in importance, now accounting for 44 percent of a typical digital video budget, up from 38 percent two years ago. Native advertising has also established a foothold in dollars spent on original digital video, accounting for one-third (32%) of that investment. “Marketers and agencies are telling us they clearly see great value in original digital video programming,” said Anna Bager, Senior Vice President and General Manager, Mobile and Video, IAB....

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Twitter wants to be better at searches for Vines, Periscopes and GIFs

Twitter wants to be better at searches for Vines, Periscopes and GIFs

By on May 11, 2016 in Blog | 0 comments

Twitter search engineer Sam Luckenbill says the social network is working on improving its search engine’s ability to index content posted to Twitter, Vine and Periscope. Earlier today, I wanted to watch the “Damn Daniel” video. The viral video that turned a pair of white Vans sneakers into a symbol of the life originated as a tweet, so I searched for it on Twitter. Bad idea. Then I remember Google has access to Twitter’s full firehose. Great idea. That’s all to say: Twitter isn’t very good at search. But Twitter seems to recognize that and the need for it to get better. In an abusively technical blog post published on Thursday, Twitter’s Director of Engineering for Search Infrastructure, Sam Luckenbill, said the company is taking another stab at the technology underpinning its search engine to make it better at identifying what exactly it is that people are searching for. “Currently, the core search infrastructure team only maintains indexes of Tweets and users,” Luckenbill wrote. But Twitter isn’t just tweets anymore. There are also Vine videos, Periscope livestreams and Moments, um, collections(?). You might see those things in your feed, or in their respective apps, already. But maybe you want to go back and find a funny “Frozen” Vine you’d seen a couple years ago. Me too, but I had to turn to Google to find it. Sometime in the future, I might actually be able to use Twitter to find that content distributed through one of Twitter’s own platforms, though Luckenbill is playing coy about the possibility (emphasis mine): “We may want to build indexes of Moments, Vines, and Periscope broadcasts,” he wrote. That’s not the only thing Twitter might want to build with its potential newfangled search capabilities. “To build a new media product we might want a new operator to find Tweets with GIFs, or to use content as a ranking signal,” Luckenbill wrote. I don’t know what exactly Twitter is planning, and Luckenbill’s jargon doesn’t help, but here’s what I hope he means: that if I want to go back and find something I saw or heard about that was on Twitter or one of its other apps, I can do it on Twitter, just like...

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